Loophole Allows Immigrants Who Use ‘Key Words’ Get Asylum

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A loophole is allowing hundreds of immigrants across the Mexico border in to the United States.

Immigrants are being taught to use “key words and phrases” to be allowed to enter and stay in the country.

Just this past Monday, Border Patrol agents say about 200 people came through the Otay Crossing claiming a quote: “credible fear” of the drug cartels.

So many were doing this that they had to close down the processing center and move the overflow by vans to another station.

“They are being told if they come across the border, when they come up to the border and they say certain words, they  will be allowed into the country,” said a person who did not want to be identified on camera.  “We are being overwhelmed.”

Pete Nunez, former U.S. Attorney and immigration expert says, “This will swamp the system.”

“To make our system even more ridiculous than it has been in the  past,” he adds.  “There are no detention facilities for families, so the family would have to be split up. We don’t want to split families up, so we end up releasing people out into the community on bond, on bail.”

Nunez says, “It’s a huge loophole.”

“There has to be a policy change, something implemented, an emergency implementation that will stop this, or otherwise we will have thousands coming in.”

Immigrants are telling the Port Enforcement Team — or P.E.T. — that the cartels are ripping apart their state.

There’s no word on whether this same loophole is being used in Arizona.

via MyFoxPhoenix

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